Tag Archives: handmade books

“How To” Books That Deserve Shelf Space #1

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I’m in the middle of my studio clean out. It definitely got worse before it got better, but today I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. Or at least the floor in some places.

I’m being rather harsh in my clean out, I don’t want to do this again soon. Everything has to earn its space. Especially books. So far I’ve donated 4 bags of books to the library and I’ve got two more boxes of books to donate to the Bay Area Book Artists Sale on Sunday, October 16th.

In my studio I have one of those Ikea bookshelves with the squares to divide books. Above is a photo of one of two squares labelled, “Book Arts How To.” I thought I’d share with you the books that I think are worth keeping in my studio and why.

Most books about Book Arts include the standard bindings, Accordion, Coptic, Pamphlet, etc. In order for me to keep a book in this category, it has to have one or more of the following:

  1. Unique binding ideas
  2. The best photos and instructions for a particular binding
  3. A gallery of book examples with outstanding artists books

Today, the first 5. Note, these are in no particular order of preference. Rather the order they are on my shelf.

Book Art Studio by Stacie Dolin and Amy Lapidow.

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The primary reason this book gets to stay? The Limp Paper Binding. A variation on the traditional Limp Vellum Binding. I haven’t tried it yet so the book goes back on my shelf.

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re-bound: creating handmade books from recycled and repurposed materials by Jeannine Stein

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This book deserves shelf space for the gallery. Here two of my favorites by Elaine Nishizu and Judi Delgado.

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Next, Book Arts: Beautiful Bindings for Handmade Books by Mary Kaye Seckler

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I keep this book for The Raven’s Foot Binding. It is a fun and unusual binding and well described here.

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More Making Books By Hand by Peter and Donna Thomas

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While there are instructions about how to make books, this one gets to stay as a catalog of Peter and Donna Thomas’ artwork. Here one of my favorites, The Trout.

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Book + Art: Handcrafting Artists’ Books by Dorothy Simpson Krause

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This book is unique in that it has Thermal Bindings (bindings created with the use of heat)

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And Drumleaf Bindings, bindings created by applying glue to the spine. Neither of which I’ve done, but both of which look interesting and useful.

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Next week, the next five.

On a personal note, the wedding in Virginia Beach was wonderful, beautiful, sentimental. We’re still smiling from the joy we shared with Samantha and Jeff.

We also experienced Tropical Storm Hermine which turned out to be stormy enough to create some challenges for the bride and groom but also disappointing after watching all of the weather channel doom and gloom.  For fun, Greg and I went to the coast at took some Hermine selfies. Here is my favorite.

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~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

 

Memories of Love – a Vintage Valentine Flutter Book for You to Cut and Fold

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I’m  a sucker for Valentine’s Day. Perhaps it is my love for chocolate or perhaps it is the pretty cards. My otherwise non-gushy husband often gives me a beautiful, sentimental card that melts my heart for the rest of the year — (I usually hear “ditto” in response to my professions of love.)

This year I’ve made a flutter book for you using images of the valentines I remember from my childhood. Remember those pretty paper valentines with the silly sayings and thin white envelopes? One of my earliest memories is being home sick from school, laying on our teal floral couch (it was the 70’s) and carefully signing my valentines in my best penmanship.

Whether as a gift for a friend, an addition to your collection, or as a way to share with your children the valentines of your youth, I hope you enjoy. Feel free to print and share as many as you’d like.

2016 Memories of Love by Ginger Burrell

This is a big file, so be patient. Click on the title below to download. Print on nice paper. For the demo book, to avoid the stark white, I printed mine on Wausau Royal Fiber in Birch. Be careful when you print. If your print dialogue defaults to “fit to page” it won’t work quite right. The book is designed to have the valentines centered on each page.

2016 Memories of Love by Ginger Burrell

After printing your page, fold the paper in half with the images on the outside and use a bone folder to make your crease sharp.

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (1 of 7)

With your paper still folded, fold each end into the middle fold. Remember to crease every fold. Unfold.

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (2 of 7)

Now fold your paper in half lengthwise. Crease with your bonefolder, then unfold.

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (3 of 7)

Re-fold your paper in half the first direction with the images on the outside. Cut with scissors, very carefully, from the top of the fold, down to the horizontal fold.

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (4 of 7)

Keeping your book folded, use the outer two folded halves to push inward. The cut halves will fold the other way so you have an X.

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (5 of 7)

Lay flat and press starting with the back page (the iron valentine). Voila!

Memories of Love Flutter Book Instructions -Ginger Burrell (6 of 7)

For more free Valentine’s books and instructions check out:

Valentine's Book for blog (1 of 2)

Make a Book for Your Sweetheart: Valentine’s Mosaic

 

 

 

and

Ginger Burrell - Valentines Flutter Book Directions (2 of 7)

A Valentine’s Flutter Book for Your Sweetheart

 

 

 

Wishing you and your loved ones a nice holiday.

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

 

 

Workshop: Valentine’s Book for Your Sweetheart – Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016

 Sees Candy Box

Valentine’s Book for Your Sweetheart

**Two spaces left for the workshop this Saturday, February 6, 2016 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Ginger’s Morgan Hill Studio**

Create a box full of books that we’ll make out of polymer clay “chocolate” and paper. Your sweetheart will want to eat the delicious looking chocolates and then be tickled to find out that each is really a book with your sentiments inside. Make a whole box full for someone special or several small books for individuals. Class fee $100, Materials Fee $15

Here are some photos of the chocolates that other students have made in this class in previous years:

Stephanie Wolfson

Nancy Welch

Carol Dwinell

Questions? Please feel free to email.

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

Paper Storage: An Alternative to Flat Files

One of the many challenges of being an artist is storing supplies and, for book artists, that means paper. Do we roll it up? Lay it flat? And where in our studio do we store paper without exposure to dust, bugs and other troublesome elements?

Ideally I think we’d all love to have a nice set, or three, of flat files. Big, flat, thin drawers to cradle all of that beautiful paper that we just can’t resist. If you’ve ever been to the annual paper sale at Flax in San Francisco, you’ll know exactly what I mean. It’s such a deal, why not buy more? Because you have to store it somewhere.

I agonized over whether I could afford flat files (I tried Craigslist and Freecycle in addition to art and office supply stores, I even tried school suppliers hoping that they might have a bit more of a bargain for classroom storage) and, even if I could afford them, would they fit in my studio, a 10 x 10 bedroom? The only option was to remove my work table and use the top of the flat files as workspace.  I didn’t really like this idea and thought long and hard about what I truly needed.

I realized that because of the size limitations of my computer printer it was unlikely that I would ever make artists’ books that would need full sheets of paper. This changed the size of the paper that I needed to store from 22 x 30 to half sheets of 22 x 15. I knew I wanted drawers, not containers with lids, so that I could stack them and not have to move anything to get to the paper. I do enough of that shuffling around already in my studio. I scoured the local stores and the internet for a product that would work.

Enter the Wide Underbed Drawers from the Container Store. These stackable drawers are 23 x 27 x 6.5 high and easily hold half sheets of pretty much any paper I’ve bought. It turns out that 6 of them fit neatly between my upper and lower linen closets. Aha. Instant flat paper storage for a pittance compared to the price of flat files. $150 for six drawers (38 ” of stacked height) instead of the $500-$1500 I would have paid for flat files. Even better, by ordering online and picking up at my local Container store, shipping is free and they brought the items to my car. Now that is customer service.

I’ve had my stacking drawers for more than a year now. I’m very happy with the size, the ease of stacking and the amount of paper I can fit in the drawers. They are easy to open and close and do not jam. Because of their height, I am able to store boxes in the drawers to divide the paper. For example, if I’ve cut Rives to 8.5 x 11 grain short and Rives to 8.5 x 11 grain long I want to be able to store them separately but I don’t want to use up a whole drawer for just one stack. I use the Stockholm Office Boxes, also from the Container Store, to hold smaller sheets inside the larger drawers. (Just to be clear, I have no affiliation with The Container Store, I just love these products enough to recommend them.)

I have no idea yet where this flat paper storage will go in my new studio, but because of their stackability there is a lot of flexibility, certainly more than if I’d purchased flat files.

A friend of mine, Kitta, stores hers in rolls in a wine rack turned on it’s back, another friend under her bed. How do you store large pieces of paper for your art?

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com

Happy Thanksgiving – My Gift to You – A Thanksgiving Book

Every year I think about giving a Thanksgiving message to the people in my life for whom I am grateful and every year I get too close to Thanksgiving and run out of time. So this year, I’ve made this foldable book, using one of my all time favorite fall foliage photographs, to give away. It’s a simple structure and, as my gift to you, you’re welcome to print and make as many of them as you’d like. Use it to say thank you to someone who is important to you. Or many someones. I’ve left the last page blank for you to write in a personal message.

Here is the PDF file, click on the link, not the photo. Be patient, it is a very large file: Thanksgiving Book by Ginger Burrell

For instructions on how to fold it, try Marc Snyder’s How to Make an Eight Page Book Out of a Single Sheet of Paper. (Except there are no edges to trim before beginning.)

For more free books, check out Free For All.

I’m thankful for my many friends in the art community. To all of you, thank you – And a very Happy Thanksgiving.

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com

Making Art from Paint Chips: “So Different” (3 of 3)

Don Drake, who is the artist at Dreaming Mind, recently completed an edition of So Different.  When I saw the book, I loved his very creative and thought-provoking use of “white” paint chips. I’ve looked at a lot of paint chips and I’d never thought of using them in this way. But then that is what makes art so wonderful, many of us can look at the same starting materials and create such different art. Today is the last post about art using paint chips. From boxes, to flag book flags, to exploring perception of color.

Don says of his book, So Different:

“So Different was sparked by a routine conflict with a friend and the subconscious urges to forgive and punish that bubbled up. The result was a cycle of 4 short poems. I read them as psychic autopsies; an opportunity to stand aside and view the paradoxical logic the us-and-them. Paint chips seemed a perfect illustration for these character studies. Their subtle hues only take on real meaning when placed in a context and their names are crafted to evoke emotion and memory.”

Have you made art using paint chips? Feel free to post a link to your work in the comments section.

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com

The Heaven Project

The Heaven Project began during a trip to Yellowstone National Park during the summer of 2009. I came across a rabbit that had been run over and had the thought that bunnies must go to Heaven because obviously they were “good.” What could a rabbit possibly do that wasn’t good?

I was not brought up in any specific religion, and my mental picture of Heaven is still the one I’ve had since I was a little girl kneeling next to my bed with my grandma teaching me the words, “Now I lay me down to sleep.” I started to wonder where God put all of the people and animals when they go to Heaven.

I asked my husband his opinion, and assumed, since he was raised Catholic, that there would be a standard answer. Instead, he told me that he thinks Heaven is individual for each person. That God grants us the Heaven we envision. If there are bunnies in my version of Heaven, then they’ll be there. If my grandma is in my version, she’ll be there, too.

I didn’t expect this answer from someone brought up with a particular church doctrine, and I started to wonder. What does each person think their Heaven will look like?

I sent out an e-mail to mailing lists and list-servs with the above text and asked people to send me a description of their version of Heaven. The replies are generous, trusting and sublime. It has been a gift to be allowed a glimpse into such personal visions.

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com