Tag Archives: 23 Sandy Gallery

Pop-Up “How To” Books That Deserve Shelf Space

This post is the 4th in a series detailing the “How To” books that survived my studio clean out because they deserve the space they occupy. I’ve been waiting to share with you about the Pop-Up Section until the Pop Up Now II show opened at 23 Sandy Gallery in Portland, Oregon. If you’d like to see the show in person it isn’t too late. The show is open until December 17th.

In case you’d like to read the previous posts:

“How To” Books That Deserve Shelf Space #1

“How To” Books that Deserve Shelf Space #2

“How To” Books that Deserve Shelf Space #3

Pop Up Now II at 23 Sandy Gallery

Now, to move on to Pop-Up “How To” books. Here they are in no-particular order. And I have to mention there are a few more that I want but don’t own yet.

The Elements of Pop-Up: A Pop-Up Book for Aspiring Paper Engineers by David A. Carter and James Diaz

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Don’t like the title scare you away. You don’t have to be any kind of engineer to use this book successfully. If you’re going the kind of person who needs a physical representation of pop-ups in order to figure them out (as I am), this book is for you! It has step by step instructions and detailed information on each kind of pop-up included and…

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it has actual pop-up samples of each kind. If necessary you can take them out of the book and take them apart, but not easily. (Don’t ask how I know this.)

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The Pop-Up Book: Step-by-Step Instructions for Creating Over 100 Original Paper Projects by Paul Jackson

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This is a beautifully illustrated book with extensive diagrams, photos and examples of each kind of technique. For example, “Shape of Slit.” While it looks complicated, the pop-up below is actually two folds and a cut slit. Paul Jackson will have you making fabulous pop-ups in no time.

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Playing with Pop-Ups: The Art of Dimensional, Moving Paper Designs by Helen Hiebert

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Helen Hiebert’s books are always excellent. This one features moveable features like volvelles in addition to the pop-up elements included in the first two books. I especially like that she includes historical information about the techniques.

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If you feel like you already know all there is to know about pop-up techniques, it’s still worth the purchase of this Helen Hiebert book. In addition to a very strong “how to” section, there is this beautiful gallery section. Here are some samples by Julie Chen.

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The Art of Pop-Up: The Magical World of Three-Dimensional Books by Jean-Charles Trebbi

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While this book does have some “how to” at the end, and some samples (see the last photos), the real strength is the history and examples of pop up and move-able books. It’s an education and eye-candy combined.

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I especially love the “Picture from ‘Transforming Performers: with Surprise Pictures” on the page below. Such a simple and do-able concept, but also eye-catching and a terrific way to advance content in a book.

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There is also an extensive gallery section that will introduce you to pop-up artists and their work. It’s a great jumping off point to spend some time with Google and learn even more about these pop-up geniuses.

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These last two photos are samples of the “how to” section of the book. Adequate, but not a good starter book. And honestly I don’t use it for this. But the first two sections are fabulous.

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Well, now I want to go to the studio to make pop-up books! How about this? Next week I’ll give you a freebie tutorial on making pop-up trees. Perfect to use in holiday cards.

Do you have a “How To” Pop-Up book you’d recommend? Please share in the comments!

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

Pop Up Now II at 23 Sandy Gallery

bettina-pauly-grimms-fairy-tale-theatre-hansel-and-gretel (Bettina Pauly)

I’ve been waiting for the Pop Up Now II Show to open at 23 Sandy Gallery  to share with you the “How To” books about Pop Ups that I keep in my studio. I had planned to tell you about those books with you in this week’s blog post but now, as I’m editing the post, I realize I’m out of time. So, here is the first part of two parts:

jihae-kwon (Jihae Kwon)

One of the many great things that Laura Russell and her staff do with shows is build a beautiful online catalog of all the work in each show. Although I try to go in person, and had hoped to go this time, a sick cat means I have to enjoy the books from afar. Grab your favorite beverage and take a moment, or an hour or two, to wander through the amazing books in this show. And, it’s not too late to go in person, the show is open until December 17th.

the-day-i-met-george-don-drake (Don Drake)

Some of my favorites, although very hard to choose, include Bettina Pauly’s Grimm’s Fairy Tale Theatre “Hansel and Gretel”, A Different Kind of Carousel by Jihae Kwon, The Day I Met George by Don Drake, and Uri Mwita Mama by Judy Sgantas.

uri-mwita-mama-by-judy-sgantas  (Judy Sgantas)

And, for only $25 you can get a full color Exhibition Catalog for your collection. I just ordered mine today.

And now that I’ve enjoyed the pop-up books in 23 Sandy gallery show,  I’ve got to get back in the studio. So, next week I’ll share with you the Pop Up “How To” Books I keep on my bookshelf.

Until then, have a good week.

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

1517actsofkindness.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

“How To” Books That Deserve Shelf Space #2

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The studio is getting cleaner, but I’m still far from done. I’m afraid I’m having to undo years of bad stashing habits. Creating new strategies and new systems is taking longer than I’d like. I am, however, determined not to stash anything this time around.

In the meantime, here are the second five books that have earned shelf space on my new, cleaned out, bookshelf.

As a reminder, my criteria for a book staying include one or more of the following:

  1. Unique binding ideas
  2. The best photos and instructions for a particular binding
  3. A gallery of book examples with outstanding artists books.

In case you’re wondering about the first five, here are the “How To” Books That Deserve Shelf Space #1 from last week’s blog post.

This week’s five:

Making Books by Hand by Mary McCarthy and Philip Manna

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This book has outstanding diagrams and clearly labels everything. Excellent for a beginner and a good reminder for experienced artist. There are also several box structures that I find useful such as this portfolio, below. Apologies for the bad photo, the glossy black page and my studio lighting were not making friends, you get the idea.

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Books Unbound by Michael Jacobs

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This book is probably in my top 5. It does not have the clearest instructions and he does not use the best materials, but Michael Jacobs approaches bookmaking from a sculptural standpoint and the books and boxes he creates are truly unique.

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The Matchbox Marvel, above, is typical of his enthusiasm to combine book structures and boxes into interesting shapes and variations. His Specimen Book, below,  is one of my favorites. I’ve made this as a gift a few times. It is always a hit. A wonderful way to highlight a treasured (small) item.

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Also in my top 5, Making Handmade Books: 100+ Bindings, Structures & Forms by Alisa Golden

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This book is the most comprehensive on my shelf. If you’re only going to own one “How To” book on making handmade books – this is it. From basic accordion books to basic pop-up and move-able books, you can find something here to fit your ideas. If if you use scrap materials and patience, you can teach yourself any of these bindings or boxes.

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235 pages of instructions, diagrams and ideas!

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You’ll notice the next two books are also by Alisa Golden. There is a lot of overlap with the Making Handmade Books, above. Virtually all of the instructions and diagrams from the next two books are in the 100+ book. So… I wouldn’t recommend buying them, too. Unless you find them for a great price. What makes them worth having are the gallery/example photos that are not in the Making Handmade Books. I’m still debating whether they have enough value to stay on the shelves. But for right now they’ve earned a spot. When that shelf begins to overflow again, these are the first two I’d reconsider.

 

Unique Handmade Books by Alisa Golden

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Creating Handmade Books by Alisa Golden

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One more set of five to finish out that shelf and then we’ll move on to some other topics. In fact, I’m looking forward to my husband, Greg, writing some guest posts. One on lighting, which we’ve just redone in my studio and one on what it’s like to be in his role as a support system and collaborator for an artist.

You may have noticed that I haven’t talked about the Pop-Up “How To” books in that shelf cubby. I’m saving that discussion for November when the Pop-Up Now Exhibition opens  at 23 Sandy Gallery.

Do you have a “How To” Book  in your studio that I should have in mine? Give me some of your recommendations in the comments!

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

 

Codex Finds 2015 at 23 Sandy Gallery

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It is an honor to have been invited by Laura Russell to participate in Codex Finds 2015. I have 3 books in the show, Twenty Six Charging Stations, Birth/Control and Public Privacy.

Get yourself a cup of coffee or tea (or, if it’s late enough, a glass of wine) and spend some time perusing the beautiful full color online catalog. Even better, if you can get there between March 25 – April 25, 2015, stop by the gallery and enjoy the artists books in person.

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

Book Power Redux at 23 Sandy Gallery in Portland

Book Power Redux copyright 23 Sandy Gallery

We had the pleasure of traveling to Portland last weekend for the opening of Book Power Redux at 23 Sandy Gallery. I’ve known Laura Russell, owner of 23 Sandy, since the beginning of my career as a book artist but had never had the opportunity, until now, to see the gallery. It is a lovely, light and airy space with a lot of good display opportunities and, of course, you get to chat with Laura, which is always educational.

I’ll tell you about the book show in a moment, but first I have to share a dining tip from Laura – The Screen Door restaurant.  Laura was not exaggerating when she said they have “fried chicken so good it will make you cry.” Greg thought it was more than worth the hour wait and I guarantee that this will be a “must go” every time we are in Portland.

Speaking of Portland, we fell in love with it. I have several blog posts worth of art info to share with you but today I’ll start with the show:

Book Power Redux is an interesting and disconcerting combination of beautifully made artists books carrying difficult messages.  It is one of the strongest shows I’ve seen in a while both in terms of content and artistry.  I am honored to have two of my pieces, Sandy Hook and Assume the Position, included.

Laura has put together a full color catalog of the show and I encourage you to purchase and peruse it. At $25 it is far cheaper than a trip to Portland and well worth the artists’ statements and photographs. You can also purchase the individual works directly from the 23 Sandy Gallery website which is pretty darned slick!

Many of the works stood out for us (I went with my husband, Greg, and our dear friend, Steve, a photographer who lives in Seattle).  I encourage you to wander through the website and experience each book. Here is a quick link to be able to access all of the books easily. Here are a few to get you started (Sorry there are no photos here, please click-through to see the imagery):

my not so ordinary life by Christine Wagner is  delicate, elegant and painful to read. This artists’ book describes her experience with domestic violence and left me appreciating her willingness to share such a difficult story, her juxtaposition of delicate and pretty materials with brutal language, and with the sense that I am tremendously fortunate to not be able to relate directly.

Like most of the work created originally for the Al Mutanabbi project, Sunt Lacrimae Rerum by Amaranth Borsuk is powerful and moving. Her use of laser-cut text, that tears away each time the book is opened, is simple and just so.

Ten Little White Folk by Shawna Hanel had only one downside. It is a unique work and was already sold by the time the show opened. Greg and I would like to have this witty and well-done book in our collection.

Why You Can’t Get Married by Nava Atlas uses the format of a wedding album to “demonstrate how the very arguments used to oppose interracial marriage in generations past have been recycled for use against same-sex marriage.” While Greg and I can relate to this personally, as our marriage would have once been illegal, it is also the artist’s choices of imagery, text and format that really spoke to us.

Did you see the show either in person or online? Please feel free to post your recommendations in the comments.

~Ginger

http://www.gingerburrell.com

 

 

 

 

CBAA Member Showcase: Laura Russell

Many of us in the artist book world know Laura Russell as the owner of 23 Sandy Gallery in Portland, Oregon, but did you also know that Laura is an artist? I first met her when she taught a class at the San Francisco Center for the Book where I admired her artists’ books including Colfax Day and Night and Colorado Wall Dogs.

At the CBAA conference Member Showcase I enjoyed some of Laura’s newer work especially Good Will & Salvation. This new artists’ book highlights Laura’s skill as a photographer as well honoring her relationship with her mother. The photos are vivid and interesting and the juxtaposition of the images is thought-provoking. Every day objects become still lifes of memories, cast-offs from childhood and remainders of old technology.

The use of Heidi Kyle’s woven and interlocking accordion structure allows the book to open in a traditional manner as well as be displayed in a long and three-dimensional almost caterpillar-like form. Laura makes good use of the center woven strip as an opportunity for further imagery.

Next: Kent Manske, Nanette Wylde and PreNeo Press

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com

What Do Your Entry Fees Pay for When You Enter a Juried Show?

Participating in gallery shows can feel like one expense after another for an artist. Not only are we paying entry fees for most shows, but we’re also paying for shipping to (and maybe from), packing materials and, if we’re fortunate enough to sell something in the show, we’re paying a percentage to the gallery. Often we enter shows and get little to no feedback about the process, our artwork, or the response to our work. In fact, in general, the gallery system is quite mysterious.

As book artists, we’re very fortunate to have gallery owners like Laura Russell who are willing to take the time to explain how galleries work. Laura, who runs 23 Sandy Gallery, is always gracious and patient. After our recent email exchange Laura used her own blog to answer my questions about what the submission fees pay for when you enter a juried show.

Some of the expenses seemed obvious, such as postcard printing and mailing, but others less so – such as paying a programmer to create the online forms we artists use to apply to the shows.

I think you’ll find Laura’s answer interesting. You can read the full text of her answer here.

And while you’re at the blog, take a moment to wander around the 23 Sandy Popular Postings (top right column), you’ll see more information that galleries rarely share with artists.

As always, thank you Laura.

~Ginger

www.gingerburrell.com